Idran
fallen-fighter-:

rebelsofshield:

ninastestanin:

christmas-type-furret:

This is literally the most bomb-ass D&D story I’ve ever read in my life oh my god.

Holy shit ._.

Some RP sessions have better stories than actual fiction. I mean, goddamn.

^This

fallen-fighter-:

rebelsofshield:

ninastestanin:

christmas-type-furret:

This is literally the most bomb-ass D&D story I’ve ever read in my life oh my god.

Holy shit ._.

Some RP sessions have better stories than actual fiction. I mean, goddamn.

^This

zerostatereflex:

Introducing large scale multi axis 3D printing in metal!

Pretty soon we’ll be 3D printing everything, perhaps even your house one day. 

NICE! 

onlylolgifs:

Dry ice & dish soap 

onlylolgifs:

Dry ice & dish soap 

kilosophy:

oh shit

vulcandroid:

i will never be over the fact that during first contact a human offered their hand to a vulcan and the vulcan was just like “wow humans are fucking wild” and took it

outofcontextdnd:

DM: You fail to smash open the door. All you manage to do is leave a dent in it.

Dwarf: Shit. Is there any other way in?

DM: Well, there’s a doorknob.

outofcontextdnd:

There were typos I know you guys must be outraged.

outofcontextdnd:

There were typos I know you guys must be outraged.

pipensanait:

A Single Thread Wrapped Around Thousands of Nails by Kumi Yamashita

Kumi Yamashita , whose mind-blowing shadow artworks have been featured before, uses a single, unbroken thread wrapped around thousands of nails to create stunning portraits of women and men.

In the ongoing series entitled Constellation (a nod to the Greek tradition of tracing mythical figures in the sky), the Japanese artist (living and working in New York) uses three simple materials to produce these otherworldly works of art.

spectreslyd:

mitzi—may:

deepredroom:

A reminder that “male” armour usually works just as well with female bodies. If you’re trying to design something practical, useful and historical looking (or even just something the follows the laws of physics), never ever put in boob cups. Aside from the fact they give the armour a sort of “focus point” for swords, falling down on them would send the shock right into the sternum. Regular plate armour leaves enough space between the chest for small to medium sized boobs anyway. But say the girl underneath is a buxom lass, you can still avoid that cleavage, boob cup shape while leaving enough space for her melons.

But aside from plate, things like the top picture, chainmail and all sorts of leather armour are unisex. I know you might be thinking that the feminine thing to do when designing a female warrior is to show off a bit of thigh or neck or cleavage or something, but really, understand that if the goal of that armour is to protect completely, putting an obvious gap in it is a terrible idea and she’ll surely get stabbed very quickly.

And don’t feed me the “it’s magic, I don’t got to explain shit” line. Bollox. Magic armour and forcefields need to make some sense too. Show me something that LOOKS like it’s generating a barrier over the character instead of just saying “Oh the G-string of Invulnerability is just as good as wearing full plate anyway”. If that’s the case, everyone would wear it. And why can’t they just tie it around their belt? Make me believe that your magic armour and spells have logic to them. If not, please don’t play your world straight. I’m all for super stylised designs as long as they’re sold as such, but if you’re trying to make a world that feels real enough for people to believe and get immersed in, think this stuff out. If you’ve designed someone with sparse, gapped armour that shows skin, give your character a reason to wear it.

yes. also the woman in the 5th photo is my knight in shining armor <3

lifemadesimple:

The Psychology of Colour -

A Guide for Designers.

faisdm:

professorbublitz:

chili-das-schaf:

shychemist:

antimatteriscool:

carlboygenius:

All Life is Chemical.

The chemistry of organic foods.

People be like “don’t eat food if you can’t pronounce the ingredients, it’s bad for you!”

Please,
Something I can pronounce, cyanide.
Something I can’t pronounce, Eicosapentaenoic acid, shit that’s actually good for you.

These posts make me so happy every time they hit my dash. <3

Each time someone says “I WANT SOMETHING ALL NATURAL WITHOUT CHEMICALS” I want to show them this.

image

Whenever I see lists of chemicals like this, I hear them in Ed Elric’s voice in my head.

monetizeyourcat:

minimalisturl:

crimewave420:

thesleuthjournal:

Scientists Create The World’s First Glow-In-The-Dark Pigs

wait but

no dont worry, its science

have you ever tried to find a pig in the dark? it’s fucking hard. there’s no downside to this

monetizeyourcat:

minimalisturl:

crimewave420:

thesleuthjournal:

Scientists Create The World’s First Glow-In-The-Dark Pigs

wait but

no dont worry, its science

have you ever tried to find a pig in the dark? it’s fucking hard. there’s no downside to this

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts:

emir-dynamite:

caterinasforzas:

image

The world’s oldest cosmetic face cream, complete with the finger marks of its last user 2,000 years ago, has been found by archaeologists excavating a Roman temple on the banks of London’s River Thames.

Measuring 6 cm by 5 cm, the tightly sealed, cylindrical tin can was opened yesterday at the Museum of London to reveal a pungent-smelling white cream.

“It seems to be very much like an ointment, and it’s got finger marks in the lid … whoever used it last has applied it to something with their fingers and used the lid as a dish to take the ointment out,” museum curator Liz Barham said as she opened the box.

The superbly made canister, now on display at the museum, was made almost entirely of tin, a precious metal at that time. Perhaps a beauty treatment for a fashionable Roman lady or even a face paint used in temple ritual, the cream is currently undergoing scientific analysis.

“We don’t yet know whether the cream was medicinal, cosmetic or entirely ritualistic. We’re lucky in London to have a marshy site where the contents of this completely sealed box must have been preserved very quickly - the metal is hardly corroded at all,” said Nansi Rosenberg, a senior archaeological consultant on the project.

“This is an extraordinary discovery,” Federico Nappo, an expert on ancient Roman cosmetics of Pompeii. “It is likely that the cream contains animal fats. We know that the Romans used donkey’s milk as a treatment for the skin. However, it should not be very difficult to find out the cream’s composition.”

The pot, which appears to have been deliberately hidden, was found at the bottom of a sealed ditch in Southwark, about two miles south of central London.

Placed at the point where three roads meet near the river crossing - Watling St from Dover, Stane St from Chichester and the bridgehead road over the Thames - the site contains the foundations of two Roman-Celtic temples, a guest house, an outdoor area suitable for mass worship, plinths for statues and a stone pillar.

The complex, which last year revealed a stone tablet with the earliest known inscription bearing the Roman name of London, dates to around the mid-2nd century. It is the first religious complex to be found in the capital, rare evidence of organized religion in London 2,000 years ago.

“The analysis and interpretation of the finds has only just begun, and I’ve no doubt there are further discoveries to be made as we piece together the jigsaw puzzle we’ve excavated,” Rosenberg said. “But it already alters our whole perception - Southwark was a major religious focus of the Roman capital.”

 

This is amazing, how did this beauty product managed to be preserved for 2000 years to shred some light on daily roman era London life was.