Idran

thesunlitgarden:

inthemindofasociopath:

thisbigcity:

Well that’s my life changed forever.

I AM A NEW MAN (because im a girl…..)

whoa

A couple days ago…

youngbadmanbrown:

daninm:

i experienced something that borke my heart. Something the perhaps every child of colour has experienced. I went over some of the members of my church house, they’re all younger girls and teens, and we just went to hang out. They are all really sweet. The youngest girl felt left out of the conversation so i went to play the wii with her. She wanted to make her own mii character so i let her. She went in and selected face shapes and everything and when she was done, her mii was white, with brown hair and blue eyes.

I asked her “Is that you?”

Se told me”No. She’s pretty.”

I said, “Well, why is she white? She’d still be pretty if she was black. She doesn’t look like you.”

She said”She won’t look right if its black.”

I said “You’re beautiful, make it look like you.”

She sighed, as if the utter idea of changing her skin and eye colour to actually look like her was too much work. She cycled through the skin colours one by one asking me if these were the right colours. She’s pretty dark, so when she finally landed on the right one, which was the very last one, she didn’t look at me. Se just sighed. She didn’t even want to change the hair and eye colours to look like her. She said “they dont have braids anyway.” and then she named her mii and kept her with straight brown hair, changed her eyes brown and dark brown skin.

She looked at me and said”She doesn’t look right.”

I asked her “Why? You don’t think she’s beautiful?”

She didn’t say anything so i left it at that. I was so upset about the whole thing that I couldn’t even talk about it relly til now.

People say white washing doesn’t affect our children. They say children can’t see colour. They say children dont care about racism…. they say a lot of things, none of which are true. If they were, i doubt any of this would have happened, or has happened to our Children of colour.

=(

astrodidact:

This is beautiful. They are called Gourd lamps. This particular designer is called Calabarte.

Check this out…

http://freshome.com/2011/06/20/amazing-exotic-gourd-lamps-from-calabarte/

ikenbot:

Supermassive Black Hole at Work
Image Credit: NASA, S. Gezari (The Johns Hopkins University), and J. Guillochon (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Back in 2010, astronomers witnessed an explosion of light from a star that was obliterated by a supermassive black hole. This is an accurate computer simulation of the event that took place.

ikenbot:

Supermassive Black Hole at Work

Image Credit: NASA, S. Gezari (The Johns Hopkins University), and J. Guillochon (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Back in 2010, astronomers witnessed an explosion of light from a star that was obliterated by a supermassive black hole. This is an accurate computer simulation of the event that took place.

alrashdan:

Excellent question from a second grader! Oh my god, that didn’t came to my mind, are you sure you’re that young? :P

landoascadd:

The City was an Endless Building.

In Çatal Höyük, there used to be no streets or pathways. Instead, façade walls touched each other without any gap in-between. With a single opening on the roof, each dwelling’s chimney functioned as lighting window as well as entrance door.
Discovered in Turkish Anatolia close to the Syrian border ca. 6,000 BC, it is one of the best-preserved Neolithic settlements. Contiguous constructions made people use rooftops as a very lively public space. The city was an endless building. Dwellers should climb up a timber ladder to get onto the roofs topography; walk along and above their neighbours’ homes, until they found the hole from where to climb down through another ladder into their own.
Every mud brick dwelling provided a piece of public space for people to meet or simply pass by, safe from wild animals. Çatal Höyük was also a sort of fortress or vantage point to watch the surrounding territory. These man-made vertical caves provided optimal environmental conditions throughout the year. Ecology already started with the up to 18 layers of recycled rubble from previously collapsed buildings that configured the foundations of every new house. In addition, there was an open site for collective waste dumping.

landoascadd:

The City was an Endless Building.

In Çatal Höyük, there used to be no streets or pathways. Instead, façade walls touched each other without any gap in-between. With a single opening on the roof, each dwelling’s chimney functioned as lighting window as well as entrance door.

Discovered in Turkish Anatolia close to the Syrian border ca. 6,000 BC, it is one of the best-preserved Neolithic settlements. Contiguous constructions made people use rooftops as a very lively public space. The city was an endless building. Dwellers should climb up a timber ladder to get onto the roofs topography; walk along and above their neighbours’ homes, until they found the hole from where to climb down through another ladder into their own.

Every mud brick dwelling provided a piece of public space for people to meet or simply pass by, safe from wild animals. Çatal Höyük was also a sort of fortress or vantage point to watch the surrounding territory. These man-made vertical caves provided optimal environmental conditions throughout the year. Ecology already started with the up to 18 layers of recycled rubble from previously collapsed buildings that configured the foundations of every new house. In addition, there was an open site for collective waste dumping.

binaryfiction:

terrestrial-noesis:

Ta Prohm Temple, Cambodia

Okay so I need to go here.